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List of Grand Slam men's singles champions - Wikipedia

Don Budge is the only male player in tennis history to have won six consecutive Grand Slam singles titles, from Wimbledon 1937 to U.S. Championships 1938. Ken Rosewall holds a record 15 Pro Slam titles, and a record 23 overall Major titles , counting both Amateur and Pro circuits.

Tennis Grand Slam Men's Champions - Tennis Grand Slam Men's ...

U.S. Open. Novak Djokovic. Juan Martin del Potro. 2018. Wimbledon. Novak Djokovic. Kevin Anderson. 2018. French Open.

Tennis Grand Slam Winners Male - Image Results

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Chronological list of men's Grand Slam tennis champions ...

Don Budge, completed a Grand Slam at the 1938 U.S. Championships. Rod Laver, completed a Grand ...

Men's Tennis: Players with the Most Grand Slam Tournaments Won

Who won the most Grand Slam Tournaments? Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal won 20 ...

Male Grand Slam winners with most titles 2020 | Statista

Roger Federer has won a record 20 tennis Grand Slam titles in his career, one more than fellow modern great, Rafael Nadal, and three more than Novak Djokovic. Skip to main content Try our ...

Grand slam winners record: How Djokovic, Federer and Nadal ...

Tokyo protests S. Korea court order to sell assets for WWII compensation. The race continues for the most grand slam titles in men’s tennis, with Novak Djokovichoping to overtake Roger ...

All-time tennis records – men's singles - Wikipedia

All-time tennis records – men's singles, covers the period from 1877 to present. Before the beginning of the Open Era in April 1968, only amateurs were allowed to compete in established tennis tournaments, including the four Grand Slam tournaments (also known as the Majors). Wimbledon, the oldest of the Majors, was founded in 1877, followed ...

Grand Slam (tennis) - Wikipedia

The locations of the four Grand Slam championships. With the growing popularity of tennis, and with the hopes of unifying the sport's rules internationally, the British and French associations started discussions at their Davis Cup tie, and in October of 1912 organized a meeting in Paris, joined by the Australasian, Austrian, Belgian, Spanish, and Swiss associations.